Forestry Triad

Associate of Science in Forestry

The Associate of Science degree in Forestry is for students who are interested in transferring to a four-year program in Forestry. This degree has been designed so that students will have completed most courses required for the Baccalaureate Core and the prerequisite requirements for Oregon State University’s Professional School in Forestry upon graduation from TBCC. For students who are interested in earning a shorter certificate in Forest Technology, please see the Agriculture and Natural Resources degree program. This is a good option for students who want to get into the workforce more quickly. All of the courses in the Forest Technology Certificate can be applied to the Associate of Science in Forestry and to the AAS degree in Agriculture and Natural Resources.

Associate of Science in Forestry = 96 Credits

See the degree worksheet above for course requirements.

Forest Technology Pathway Certificate = 27 Credits

  • The certificate can be the first step into the degree or get students into the workforce more quickly. The certificate also bridges to the AAS in Agriculture and Natural Resources degree. For certificate courses and outcomes see the Agriculture and Natural Resources page of this website. For additional information, please contact the OSU Open Campus Education Coordinator/Agriculture and Natural Resources Program Coordinator at 503-842-8222 ext. 1870.

Program Outcomes

Upon successful completion of the Associate of Science in Forestry, students will be able to:

  • Integrate technical field skills with analytical skills to identify important forest management challenges and identify potential solutions for these problems.
  • Explain and discuss important current issues, and social and political components of forest management in the United States and other countries.
  • Demonstrate basic skills in forest surveying, recreation management, soil science, geographic information systems, and spreadsheet applications.
  • Identify important tree and shrub species in the Pacific Northwest.